BELLSTECH INAUGURAL LECTURE SERIES NO. 2


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BELLSTECH INAUGURAL LECTURE SERIES NO. 2


CRISES FOR HUMAN SURVIVAL IN NIGERIAN FORESTS

An Inaugural Lecture Delivered by Professor Gbadebo Jonathan Osemeobo, of the College of Natural and Applied Sciences, Bells University of Technology, Ota, Ogun State, Nigeria, at the Multi-Purpose Hall, Bells University of Technology, Ota, on Thursday, 14th January, 2016.

 

THE FOUNDATION

 

Preamble

The Department of Biological Sciences is one of the foundation Departments in the College of Natural and Applied Sciences, Bells University of Technology, Ota. This inaugural lecture is the first of its kind from the Department of Biological Sciences since its inception in 2005. The maiden inaugural lecture of the University was delivered by Prof. A.O.B. Ogunmoyela on Thursday 25th June, 2015. This is the second inaugural lecture of the University and the first from the College of Natural and Applied Sciences. It is with great humility and honour that I stand before you today as a representative of the College of Natural and Applied Sciences, to present this lecture. I am especially excited that for the first time, a forest ecologist/taxonomist is presenting the second inaugural lecture of this University. Mr. Vice Chancellor Sir, I am deeply impressed that our University did not discriminate against a sector that had often been neglected in the scheme of things in this country. To you Mr. Vice Chancellor Sir, I am most grateful for this unique opportunity given to me to elucidate on one crucial aspect of our discipline through the medium of this second inaugural lecture.

 

The title of this lecture was influenced by my experience as the Nigerian Desk Officer for the implementation of International Convention of Biological Diversity (CBD) in the Federal Ministry of Environment from 1978 to 2005. It gave me a holistic picture of efforts which Nigeria and other nations of the world had made in dealing with issues of biological conservation. I also drew experiences from traditional ecological knowledge of the tropical rainforest through the in-depth ecological studies I had carried out in ecosystem conservation. I was also exposed to the reality of human expectations from nature by my childhood familiarity with the rainforest during which period I participated with my primary school mates in picking fruits of wild mangoes, African cherry, and snails from the forest floors during holidays. I can still vividly recall the pleasant noises made by birds, mammals, insects and reptiles in the forests in my early days.

 

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